Carleton Place population isn’t getting any younger

senior-citizens-grandparents
Posted on: June 8, 2017

Matthew Behrens
editorial@pdgmedia.ca 

According to the most recent census data, the town of Carleton Place is seeing growth in the numbers of older residents, with a drop in those aged 19 and under.

Chief Administrative Office Paul Knowles presented the figures to the June 6 meeting of the town’s planning and protection committee, noting such figures were valuable tools in discussions about how the town plans for and provides services and recreation programs. While Knowles pointed to significant population growth, the bulk was in the age brackets starting at 45.

Between 2001 and 2016, those Carleton Place residents aged 40-49 grew from 2,309 to 2,870, with individuals aged 60-79 increasing from 1,137 to 2,145.  

“There’s fewer kids now than there were 15 years ago, and while we’re looking at a lot of growth, we don’t really know how many newcomers will be families with younger kids,” he said.

Asked whether the explosion in subdivisions might increase the number of younger Carleton Place residents, Knowles replied it was difficult to predict, noting many of the new units being brought on line are apartments or townhouses.

What do you think can be done to draw younger people to town? Comment below. 

4 thoughts on “Carleton Place population isn’t getting any younger

  1. Monique Mason

    Carleton Place sadly has nothing to offer older children/younger adults. Job opportunities are scarce, especially ones that pay more than minimum wage. Apartments and condos are way too expensive for young people starting out. Although we do have a taxi service, we have no bus that runs in town for those that cannot afford a car. There is no longer any entertainment venues for that age group either. An indoor sports facility would do well (not talking about a physical fitness gym), a movie theatre (sadly our old one could not afford the required upgrades). There is literally nothing to draw them here or keep them here when all these things are so abundant in the city, and at reduced costs to them.

  2. stev vanveit

    The article is somewhat correct but youth should get off their cell phones and start taking advantage of the facilities that are already here and available…
    – canoe club
    – curling club
    – arena skating and hockey
    – swimming indoor pool and beautiful beach
    – hiking trails all through town
    – library
    – soccer field
    – baseball diamonds
    – track & field, football
    – boat launch go fishing
    – theater with the MUDDS
    – farmers market start selling
    – tennis court

  3. Mel

    My husband and I moved here when we were expecting our first child due to CP having the small town feel with a great hospital, smaller schools, great sports offerings, loads of unique downtown shops and restaurants. Working in the city is not an issue thanks to the revamping of highway 7 and if we need something or want to go to the movies or Costco we drive the 20 minutes without complaint. CP is actually an extremely attractive option to young families starting out, a great place to raise a family.

    We could do with a few less thrift shops and a few more unique stores in town, but overall we have so much going on for us.

  4. Kate Murray

    Carleton Place is attracting the 25-40 age group with small children. Many many people of this community move here for price of home, small town feel and beauty of it all. I think we are collectively seeing our fantastic potential. The young people leave their small towns at 19 and younger to gain a different perspective. Usually they end right back where they started. This is happening all over Canada. University & college life calls them, bigger cities, new ideas. It is good for them and good for us once they decide to come back here in their late 20/30’s ftonstsrt a family or a business. Our job should be developing what we have so they too want to come back with their families. Making our towns worthy for age 8 to 80 should be our goal and I know we working the plan to make this happen.

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